Why is My TV Remote Controlling My Led Lights

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Why is My TV Remote Controlling My Led Lights

Your TV remote is supposed to control operations on just your TV. In fact, a supplied remote control should not operate another TV brand or model. But many users find that their TV remote control also controls their LED lights. If you are experiencing this issue, the obvious question you may ask is, how come?

To be fair, it is a strange marriage because LED lights are, well, lights. While your TV is an electronic device, very likely a smart one, that displays pictures in high definition. However, the fact that your TV remote control works on your LED lights is not so much a mystery if you understand the technology behind remote controls and LED lights.

1. You see, the main technology that is used in home remote controls is Infrared light. So, the remote control sends infrared light to your TV, which it receives using its infrared sensor.

The signals are sent as a stream or beam of infrared pulses when you press any button on your remote control.

2. Okay. To send those infrared pulses, the remote control needs a transmitter. The transmitter on the remote control is usually at the tip of the remote, which looks like a tiny bulb.

But this transmitter is a Light Emitting Diode, LED, built into that pointing end of the remote control. In fact, your TV remote control typically uses an LED wavelength of 940nanometers.

3. See? LED. Which is what your LED bulbs are, too. So, the remote control has the same component as your LED bulb. So, it makes sense that the remote control can also control your LED bulbs.

But, strictly speaking, this should not happen. You see, IR remote controls are manufactured using certain standards and protocols. Different manufacturers use different protocols for the transmission. That’s why the remote control for one TV brand will not work on another.

However, manufacturers of average-to-low quality LED lights do not care about these protocols. They use protocols already used by IR TV remote controls, which is why the remote control can also control the LED lights.

So, if your TV and such LED lights are in close proximity, or if there are reflective surfaces that can redirect the signals from your remote control, the LED lights can intercept and be operated by the IR signals from the TV remote control.

How to Stop TV Controlling LED Lights

Like we explained earlier, this phenomenon of your TV remote controlling your LED lights does not happen with all LED lights. It is not a normal phenomenon.

It only happens with LED lights that have not been manufactured with unique protocols and international standards. So, if you want to prevent this from happening, the best place to start from is to buy high-quality LED lights from manufacturers like Philips and Osram.

However, if you wish to continue using your current LED lights but want to stop them from being controlled by your TV remote control, then try any of the solutions provided below.

1. Physical Separation of TV and LED Lights Receiver

Before trying any technical fixes, the simplest thing to do where possible is to increase the distance between the TV and the LED light’s IR receiver. The good thing is that IR technology uses line of sight unlike Bluetooth, so you do not need to make any drastic physical changes to your space to achieve the required separation.

Simply remove the LED RGB control box to a position left or right of the TV or to another room until you find the point where, when you press your TV remote control, it no longer controls your LED lights.

2. Use TV Remote Control App

The next workaround to try is to download, install and use the remote control app for your TV. Most smart TVs today allow you to control them using your smartphone. All you need to do is install the remote control app and make sure that your TV and the phone are connected to the same network.

This resolves the issue because with the app, your phone would be using WIFI direct to control the TV and not infrared which your LED lights can intercept.

For Samsung TV:

1. Download and install SmartThings app from your Play Store or App Store

2. Turn on your Smasung TV

3. Connect your phone to the same WIFI network as your TV

3. Launch the SmartThings app and sign into your Samsung account

4. Tap on the + icon at the top right of the screen

5. Tap Device

6. Under By Device Type, tap on TV, then select Samsung

7. Tap TV again and then tap Start

8. Select the location and room, then tap Next

9. SmartThings will list available devices. Select your Samsung TV

The next step will vary, depending on the model of your Smart TV:

  • 2020 and 2021 models: Use the remote to select OK on the TV screen.
  • 2017 to 2019 models: Input the PIN shown on the TV screen into the phone, and tap Done.
  • 2016 models: Use the buttons on the TV or remote to select Allow.

Once the TV has been added, you may rename the TV using the SmartThings app on your phone. And then tap Done.

Now you can use your phone to control the Samsung TV by simply launching the app, tapping on the Menu icon, selecting All Devices and then selecting your paired Samsung TV.

For Vizio SmartCast TV:

1. Download and install the VIZIO SmartCast Mobile App from your App Store or Play Store

2. Connect your phone and the Vizio TV to the same WIFI network

3. Open the app and follow the onscreen prompts to create a VIZIO account, or continue as a guest

4. You will receive a prompt to get started. Click on that

5. The app will search for available Vizio devices on the network. Select your own device to pair it

6. Next, a 4-digit code will appear on your TV. Type the code into the app on your phone and finish the setup.

7. Now you can use the app to control your Vizio SmartCast TV.

For LG TV

1. Download LG TV Remote from your phone’s application store

2. Connect your phone to the same WIFI network as the LG TV

3. Launch the PG TV Remote app

4. On first launch, you will be asked whether you are using a phone or tablet for the setup. Select as appropriate

5. You will be presented with a brief demo of the app, and then with a list of compatible TVs for the app

6. Next, click on Device Scan

7. Your TV will be listed. Select it.

8. A 6-digit pairing code will appear on your TV. Enter the code into the app on your phone and click OK

9. Next, you will be prompted to accept the Terms of Use which you should accept

10. Next, you will be asked if you want to choose the TV as your default TV. Select Yes to complete the setup

11. Immediately, the remote control will appear on your phone and you can start controlling your LG TV with it.

On Fire TV:

1. Download the Fire TV app from your phone’s application store

2. Connect your phone and the Fire TV to the same WIFI network

3. Launch the Fire TV app on your phone and select your TV from the list. Your TV should be found automatically. If it is not, then click on Add Devices

4. Next, sign in to your Amazon account. Use the same account that your TV is signed in to so that they both register as your managed devices. This is not compulsory, but it makes for easier remote management of connected devices on your account.

5. A 4-digit code will be displayed next on your Fire TV. Enter it into the app on your phone

6. The remote control will immediately be displayed on your phone and you can start controlling the Fire TV with it

On Roku TV:

1. Install the Roku mobile app from your Play Store or App Store

2. Connect your phone and the Roku TV to the same WIFI network

3. Launch the Roku mobile app and it will immediately discover your Roku TV

4. Select your TV and enter the displayed pair code

5. You can now control the TV with your smartphone

Note: As at the time of writing this article, Roku mobile app is only available in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Ireland, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

So, if you do not find the app on your app store, it is not available in your country.

3. Use An RF Shield Box

Another workaround for the issue of your TV remote controlling your LED lights is to place the LED’s IR receiver in an RF shield box (view on Amazon). The shield box blocks the IR signals from your TV remote so the receiver does not intercept the signals and control your LED lights.

You could buy dedicated RF shield boxes from online stores or you could simply make one yourself using any of glass, wood, cardboard paper, bricks, or even tin foils, and then place the LED’s IR receiver in it.

4. Block sensor on LED

Another solution, perhaps less drastic than using a shielding box, is to block the sensor on the LED light’s IR receiver. To do this, you could use just enough tape to wrap over the sensor so that it does not intercept IR signals coming from your TV remote.

5. Change Remote Control Frequency

Since your TV remote control also works for your LED lights, it means that the IR frequencies of the LED wavelengths on both devices are pretty much the same. You can, therefore, set up your TV to operate at a different frequency to the LED lights so that the remote control only works on the TV.

Before performing this fix, you need to first consult your TV manual and be sure that changing TV IR frequency is permitted. If it is, then use the steps below to change your TV’s IR frequency:

On Fire TV

1. On your Fire TV, go to Settings

2. Select Equipment Control

3. Select Manage Equipment

4. Select TV

5. Select Infrared Options

6. Under IR Profile, Select Change IR Profile

7. Change it from All Devices to your particular IR Profile

If you cannot figure out your IR Profile, please use the steps below:

1. On your Fire TV, go to Settings

2. Select Equipment Control

3. Select Manage Equipment

4. Select TV

5. Select Infrared Options

6. Under IR Profile, Select Change IR Profile

7. Select Find IR Profile, and then select the IR profile for your TV

This may not work for some users who must manually enter the IR code. If you still have your TV manual, the IR RF code is written there. Or you can search on the TV manufacturer’s website for the code. Then.

1. On your Fire TV, go to Settings

2. Select Equipment Control

3. Select Manage Equipment

4. Select TV

5. Select Infrared Options

6. Under IR Profile, Select Change IR Profile

7. Select Find IR Profile

8. Then press the Menu button to enter your IR profile manually

On Roku

1. Open Settings on Roku TV

2. Select System

3. Select Control Other Devices (CEC)

4. Make sure that the box next to 1-touch Play is checked

On LG TV

1. Press the Menu button on your remote control

2. Select Settings

3. Select Remote, then select Program Remote and select TV

4. Next, toggle to switch mode to TV, and enter LG

5. Next, press and hold the OK and Mute buttons until the light on the remote control blinks 4 times

6. Next enter any of these codes 11423 or 10178 or 11178

7. Then your remote will start using the new IR code to operating the TV

In conclusion, the phenomenon of your TV remote controlling your LED lights is not strange and it is generally harmless. It does not mean that anything is malfunctioning. You can try simple things like moving the LED’s receiver far from the TV or covering its sensor with tape.

A great option is to use your TV’s smart app. If you want to go the extra length of changing the IR profile, you need to consult your TV manual first so you don’t break anything.

Brady Klinger-Meyers is an experienced tech writer and marketer who currently writes for Techzillo as well as other popular sites like MakeUseOf. At Techzillo, he focuses on consumer technology in general with his interest being Android OS. Read our Editorial Guidlines and Fact Checking process.

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